News from the IEA – Powering down to save energy need not be a turn-off

Energy in Demand - Sustainable Energy - Rod Janssen

eid2o-02After success of its 1-watt initiative, IEA turns to “smart” appliances’ power consumption in network standby

Less than a decade ago, televisions in homes around the world consumed significant electricity whether they were turned on or off. But in 1999 the IEA spearheaded the  “1-watt” initiative that led to the average new television’s standby consumption falling from about 5 watts to half a watt, saving energy for countries, money for consumers and carbon from the atmosphere.

After manufacturers developed “instant-on” televisions in the late 1960s, the trend toward standby defaults in consumer electronics spread, and soon “inactive” machines were drawing 10% of total residential electricity consumption. Even as the number of such devices mushroomed, though, new low-power technologies reduced the share of the electricity used in standby modes.

But the recent development of “smart” appliances and other devices that connect to the Internet has created a new challenge.

As homes…

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News from the IEA – Powering down to save energy need not be a turn-off

Energy in Demand - Sustainable Energy - Rod Janssen

eid2o-02After success of its 1-watt initiative, IEA turns to “smart” appliances’ power consumption in network standby

Less than a decade ago, televisions in homes around the world consumed significant electricity whether they were turned on or off. But in 1999 the IEA spearheaded the  “1-watt” initiative that led to the average new television’s standby consumption falling from about 5 watts to half a watt, saving energy for countries, money for consumers and carbon from the atmosphere.

After manufacturers developed “instant-on” televisions in the late 1960s, the trend toward standby defaults in consumer electronics spread, and soon “inactive” machines were drawing 10% of total residential electricity consumption. Even as the number of such devices mushroomed, though, new low-power technologies reduced the share of the electricity used in standby modes.

But the recent development of “smart” appliances and other devices that connect to the Internet has created a new challenge.

As homes…

View original post 826 more words

Windows 8 is for touch (Vivobook X202E)

frans goes blog

I just placed an order for Asus Vivobook X202E – a small and affordable, touchscreen-enabled Windows 8 mini-laptop. This will be an upgrade to the Samsung N220 netbook I got in March 2010. Windows 8 does not make much sense without touchscreen, and it’s success will be related to how fast people will move to hybrid, touch-enabled paradigm. Working (at home) with the Vivobook should provide opportunity for some experimentation. Its battery is not good enough for serious on-the-road use, but for home it should be ok, we will see…

X202E is not a high-end device, but if you update the touchpad driver and do a few other tweaks, it should be enough for most things. There are good tips in the Amazon.com reviews: http://www.amazon.com/VivoBook-X202E-DH31T-11-6-Inch-Touch-Laptop/product-reviews/B009F1I1C4/

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Facebook is becoming less relevant to active Internet communicators

SeekerBlog

We know that Facebook is loosing participation of the younger cohort that has been the backbone of FB growth. That doesn’t look at all good for Facebook’s future. Our own purely anecdotal evidence is that increasing numbers of researchers are shifting their efforts away from their RSS blogs towards Twitter feeds that reference the same new papers with much lower overhead.

Excerpts from Kevin Kelleher’s article “Facebook’s Growing Silent-Majority Problem”:

(…) In August, according to comScore, the time people spent on Facebook’s website dropped 12 percent from a year earlier. By contrast, time spent on Google grew 11 percent in the same period.

(…) That’s borne out by the data showing that Facebook users between 12 and 17 spent 42 percent less time on its website last month, and those between 18 and 24 spent 25 percent less time.

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